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Conference Proceedings

Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2017

Conference Proceedings

Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2017

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Determining ventilation system model inputs from field test work in the oil shale mine

Determining ventilation system model inputs from the field test work has been produced in the working oil shale mine which has been in production since the early 1970s. At this mine room-and-pillar with drill-and-blast methods are used. The mine has a complicated ventilation system to supply fresh air for the eight mining production areas on the radius of about 12km. The main purpose of the experimental test works was to obtain data for estimation of an optimum cross-section area for a new ventilation shaft. Experimental test works included measurements of air volume and fan pressure using five different modes of intake air through the ventilation shafts system. Measurements of airway friction factors were obtained during the ventilation surveys to determine characteristic friction factors for the intake airway. The results of the measurements will be used for further air flow simulation processes required for design of new additional ventilation shafts in the oil shale mine. Results of the study can be useful in estimation of frictional pressure drop in oil shale mine conditions.CITATION:Sabanov, S, 2017. Determining ventilation system model inputs from field test work in the oil shale mine, in Proceedings Australian Mine Vent Conference 2017, pp 47-50 (The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy: Melbourne).
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  • Published: 2016
  • PDF Size: 0.234 Mb.
  • Unique ID: P201704008

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