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Conference Proceedings

Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2017

Conference Proceedings

Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2017

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Recognising the deficiencies of current spontaneous combustion propensity index parameters

Current spontaneous combustion index parameters such as SHT, CPT/RIT and R70 self-heating rate all have deficiencies that need clarifying from a risk management perspective. In some instances they can produce a false negative evaluation and in others they can produce a false positive evaluation. These tests all use a relative rating scheme that does not provide any indication of the time it takes for a spontaneous combustion event to develop, nor do they consider the moderating influence of moisture present in the coal on self-heating rate in the low temperature oxidation region. This is viewed as a major deficiency since the true self-heating behaviour of broken coal is primarily a function of time that is governed by the interaction of the initial boundary conditions (initial ambient temperature and moisture state) with the reactivity of the coal (both intrinsic coal reactivity and accelerated self-heating from reactive pyrite if present). The current index tests are also not appropriate for assessment of coalmine immediate roof and floor rocks.CITATION:Beamish, B B and Theiler, J, 2017. Recognising the deficiencies of current spontaneous combustion propensity index parameters, in Proceedings Australian Mine Vent Conference 2017, pp 113-118 (The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy: Melbourne).
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  • Published: 2016
  • PDF Size: 0.448 Mb.
  • Unique ID: P201704017

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